Stomach Virus Oils For Adults & Children

December 29th, 2016 by Natalie


stomach ache

Nobody enjoys catching the stomach bug. It’s miserable, you don’t know how long it will last, and there is just not much you can do about it except treat the symptoms that accompany it. It can be even harder when families catch it! It just makes its rounds which can make for a very tired and grumpy situation. I’m going to go over how you can use essential oils to help ease the symptoms of stomach virus/food poisoning/stomach bug/etc…

 

First we are going to go over what is good to use for symptoms with adults:

ADULT USAGE

Diarrhea: Blue Chamomile, Ginger, Roman Chamomile, Peppermint, Sweet Marjoram, Sandalwood, and Linalool Thyme.

Nausea/Vomiting: Allspice, German Chamomile, Roman Chamomile, Fennel, Ginger, Nutmeg, Rose, Rosewood, Sandalwood, Geranium, and Cardamon.

Applications: These essential oils can be used in a compress over the abdomen. Fill a bowl with warm water and a few drops of essential oil of your choice, soak a wash cloth in the bowl and ring out. Apply the warm compress to the abdomen. Another way to use them is to dilute the essential oils of choice in a carrier such as fractionated coconut oil or jojoba oil and massage over the stomach in a clockwise motion around the belly button. You can also massage into the lower back. Alternatively, you can make a personal inhaler with 15 drops of your choice to the wick to help ease the symptoms. Many people also enjoy taking a warm bath with the essential oils. If you do this, please make sure you have properly diluted the essential oils because some of them can be skin sensitizing. Another way to use these essential oils is to diffuse in a diffuser or make a mist spray.

 

CHILDREN USAGE (6+YEARS)

Diarrhea: Blue Chamomile, Roman Chamomile, Peppermint, Lavender, Sandalwood, Ginger, Geranium

Nausea/Vomiting: Ginger, Peppermint, Geranium, Lavender

Applications: MAKE SURE YOU PROPERLY DILUTE FOR CHILDREN! You can make a warm compress to put on the abdomen by placing a few drops of essential oils into a bowl of warm water, soak a wash cloth in the bowl and ring out. Apply the warm compress to the abdomen. These essential oils can also be used in massage by properly diluting in a carrier oil, and massage on the abdomen in a clockwise motion around the belly button and can also be massaged into the lower back. You can also make a personal inhaler with 15 drops of essential oils of your choice which is more convenient for children because they can smell it as needed to help ease their symptoms. Or, you can diffuse a few drops in a diffuser or make a mist spray.

And now for some recipes you can make to help ease symptoms. When using these recipes, PLEASE ADJUST DILUTION RATIO AS NEEDED. THESE ARE MASTER BLENDS. IF YOU CANNOT USE AN OIL IN THE RECIPE, THEN DO NOT USE IT. OR, REPLACE IT WITH ONE YOU CAN USE.

  • Upset Stomach: 3 drops Roman Chamomile, 2 drops Ginger, 2 drops Peppermint. Diffuse, personal inhaler, or use topically (diluted) over abdomen. Massage in a clockwise motion.
  • Diarrhea Blend: 5 drops Ginger, 2 drops Peppermint, 7 drops Sandalwood, 8 drops Roman Chamomile. Diffuse, personal inhaler, or use topically (diluted) over abdomen. Massage in a clockwise motion.
  • Diarrhea Blend: 3 drops Linalool Thyme, 2 drops Lavender, 3 drops Peppermint. Diffuse, personal inhaler, or use topically (diluted) over abdomen. Massage in a clockwise motion.

 

Other essential oils that are good to focus on when dealing with a stomach virus, is anti-viral and anti-bacterial oils. You can make a mist spray with them, clean hard surfaces with them, or diffuse them in a room to help rid of germs.

Anti-viral: Oregano, Winter Savory, Bandit’s Blend, Rosewood, Patchouli, Orange, Elemi, Cinnamon Leaf, Lemon Eucalyptus, Lime, Sweet Marjoram

Anti-bacterial: Kunzea, Elemi, Bandit’s Blend, Oregano, Cinnamon Leaf, Eucalyptus 80/85, Frankincense, Geranium, Sweet Marjoram, Neroli

 

 

 

There's How Many Lavenders?

December 29th, 2016 by Natalie


Lavender…. A very popular and well-known word amongst the majority of people. You can buy lavender lotions, bubble baths, epsom salts, pillows….. There is an endless supply of merchandise that has lavender in it. But, did you know, there are different types of lavender essential oil? And each one is a bit chemically different than the other.

 

So let’s take a look at the different lavender essential oils that Gritman carries currently.

That’s quite a few different lavenders isn’t it? Well no worries! I am here to explain the differences to you so you can make the best choice for whatever you need it for.

So let’s start off with Spike Lavender, what do we know about it? Spike Lavender (Lavandin latifolia) is also called Aspic or Broad-Leaved Lavender. It comes from the Lamiaceae (mint) family of plants and is indigenous to France & Spain. Spike Lavender has more of a harsher scent than the other lavenders. This is not the lavender you would want to use for calming properties as it is actually does quite the opposite and can be stimulating. Spike Lavender has a higher 1,8-cineole count which makes it a suitable essential oil to use for coughs and congestion. Spike Lavender is not recommended to use during pregnancy.

Next, we move on to Bulgarian Lavender. Bulgarian Lavender (Lavandula augustifolia, L. officinalis) also is from the Lamiaceae (mint) plant family and is indigenous to the Meditterranean. This specific lavender has a more spicier scent than other lavenders and is a good choice if you are trying to find a good median among the other lavenders. Overall, Bulgarian Lavender is an all-around good lavender. Since Bulgarian Lavender is distilled at a higher altitude than the former Spike Lavender, it has been distilled at a few degrees lower so the distillation process takes a bit longer. When this happens, the ester counts are a bit higher which gives it that sedative/calming effect. So Bulgarian Lavender would be a good choice to use to promote sleep or during stressful times so you can calm yourself. Bulgarian Lavender is safe to use during pregnancy, but do not use it with preperations containing iodine or iron.

Now onto French Lavender, which is also known as Lavender 40/42. French Lavender is a perfume standard, which means it is highly used in the perfumery industry and for making products such as soaps, candles, lotions, linen sprays, etc. The 40/42 refers to the ratio of linalool and linalyl acetate. This essential oil is very popular as this is the lavender scent that many people are familiar with from it being used to scent various products. It is not recommended to use this specific lavender for therapeutic uses as it is mainly used for perfumery and scenting products. Because of the 40/42 ratio of linalool and linalyl acetate, it is often adulterated with synthetic constituents.

Albanian Lavender (Lavandula augustifolia, L. officinalis) is indigenous to the Mediterranean and comes from Albania. Albanian Lavender is a very gentle lavender and is lower in esters than Bulgarian Lavender. This lavender is a popular choice to use for aiding in sleep. This is a safe essential oil to use during pregnancy and with children.

Next, we have Lavandin (Lavandula hybrida, Lavandula x intermedia, L. hortensis) which is also commonly called Bastard Lavender. Lavandin is actually a hybrid of lavender and spike lavender. Lavandin grows larger than true lavender so it yields a larger amount of essential oil which makes it a cheaper option also. Lavandin is also an ester and contains linalyl acetate and linalool, but also contains cineol, camphene, pinene, and camphor. Lavandin has a sharper scent to it so it is also popularly used in product making, and the addition of camphor to it, unlike the other lavenders, makes it a popular choice to use for easing sore muscles and helping aid anxiety and stress. It is advised to avoid use of Lavandin during early pregnancy.

Now we have Northwest Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia, L. vera, L. officinalis) which is also commonly called English Lavender, Garden Lavender, or Common Lavender. Northwest Lavender is a combination of Lavandin, Bulgarian Lavender, and Tasmanian Lavender (Gritman does not carry Tasmanian). Northwest Lavender is indigenous to the Mediterranean but is produced in the USA, France, and Spain. Many people use this blend of lavenders to ease headaches and relieve tension. Northwest Lavender is safe during pregnancy, but do not use it with preparations containing iodine or iron.

Last, but not least, we have our newest addition Highland Lavender (Lavandula vera, L. augustifolia, L. officinalis). Highland Lavender is also commonly called Lavender Maillette. This lavender is distilled at high altitudes in France and has the highest linalool count at almost 32% and linalyl acetate at around 46%. With these counts, it makes Highland Lavender a great choice for calming stress or anxiety and promoting a good nights sleep. This lavender is safe to use during pregnancy, but do not use it with preparations containing iodine or iron.

 

Overall, most people enjoy lavender and its wonderful properties and aroma. I hope you got some great information about the differences in lavenders!

 

lavender photo

Clearing Negative Energy

December 26th, 2016 by Natalie


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Clearing Negative Energy

There are multiple different ways you can clear negative energy from your aura, or even a room. Have you ever walked into a room and it just felt “off” or heavy or just dragged down? You can clear this negative energy using essential oils.

When clearing negative energy, the first thing you need to do is create an intention. You want to make known your intention that you want only positive energy in the area and you welcome positive energy. All negative energy shall be ridden. Release the negative energy from the space.

Use a diffuser or make a room spray with essential oils that are used for clearing negative energy. Here is a list of some you can use. *Please keep in mind your own health/children/pets/etc when doing this. When clearing negative energy, it is best for nobody to be in the space.

  • Angel Light Blend (Gritman exclusive)
  • Juniper Berry
  • Lavender
  • Cypress
  • Frankincense
  • Myrrh
  • Sage
  • Cedarwood
  • Palo Santo
  • Sandalwood
  • Rosemary
  • Black Spruce
  • Lemon Verbena

Aromatherapy Definitions

December 15th, 2016 by Natalie


I put together some memes for everybody which defines a lot of the words used to describe the essential oil properties when you are looking up what an oil is used for. Feel free to share them or save them as personal reference! These are NOT ALL of the terms that are used in the aromatherapy industry, but it does cover quite a few of them.

-Natalie

aromatherapy definitions A aromatherapy definitions BCD aromatherapy definitions E-M aromatherapy definitions N-V

Chakras & Aromatherapy

December 13th, 2016 by Natalie


I have always enjoyed learning and teaching myself about the chakra system and how they play such an important role in our journey of life. I get asked pretty frequently about how to incorporate aromatherapy into chakra balancing or clearing chakra blockages so I figured I would spend some time today going over this topic a bit.

So if you haven’t worked with energy before, you might be asking yourself “What is all this chakra stuff?”. Chakras are energy, and energy is life. The chakras is where universal energy flows, it comes up from the earth and passes through our energy field at each chakra point. It doesn’t move in a straight line though, it is cyclic.

chakrassuperimposed

Author David Pond explains how the chakras correlate to our life journey with this simple explanation: “Picture the spine as an elevator shaft and the chakras as the various floors from which we can experience life. When you rise from one floor of consciousness to another, your perceptive expands. Or imagine the chakras as seven floors of a building. When you are on the bottom floor and looking out the window, the view is significantly different from the view through each of the other floors. With each successive elevation, one’s view becomes successively more expansive.”

When you are working with the chakras, you want them to be balanced. Any un-balance can cause unwanted situations and trigger issues related with that chakra.

 

THE 7 CHAKRAS

There are seven main chakras that fall along different areas of the body. We are going to start at the bottom with the first chakra and work our way up and I will explain each one and which essential oils you can use to help balance these chakras.

Muladhara root chakra

  1. The Root Chakra (Muladhara)
    Color: Red
    Location: The base of the tailbone.
    – The Root Chakra is the first one, located at the base of the tailbone and opens downward. This chakra is associated with the element of Earth and the basis of life. This chakra focuses on “grounding” or “rooting” which represents stability and security, and being at one with life and ourselves. When you start working with your chakra system, this is where you will start. You cannot balance any other chakras without balancing the ones that come before it.
    Essential oils that can be used to help balance the Root Chakra are: Citronella, Eucalyptus 80/85, Dalmation sage, Spanish Sage, Summer Savory, White Thyme, Vetiver, Cedarwood, Patchouli, and Myrrh.

    Swadhisthana_Chakra1

  2. The Sacral Chakra (Svadisthana)
    Color: Orange
    Location: Upper part of the sacrum below the navel.
    – The Sacral Chakra is the second chakra and corresponds to the element of Water and is associated with sexual energy, or “prana”. It is also associated with creativity, enthusiasm, friendships/relationships, and feelings of joy. When the Sacral Chakra is not in balance, we can have feelings of anger, jealousy, overprotectiveness, and just an inability to feel love. Essential oils that can be used to balance the Sacral Chakra are: Damiana, Davana, Laurel Berry, Mentha Citrata, Dalmation Sage, Summer Savory, Black Spruce, Hemlock Spruce, Tea Tree, White Thyme, Vetiver, Sandalwood, Jasmine, Rose, Ylang-Ylang, and Champaca.

    Manipura solar plexus chakra

  3. The Solar Plexus Chakra (Manipura)
    Color: Yellow
    Location: Between the navel and the bottom of the sternum.
    – The Solar Plexus Chakra is the third in the chakra system is yellow which symbolizes the Sun, but it is also associated with the element of Fire. The Solar Plexus is the location where we hold our power, expansiveness, and growth. When this chakra is out of balance, you can be experiencing feelings of sadness, disgust, fear, jealousy, anxiety, stress, and being opinionated. Essential oils that can be used to help balance the Solar Plexus Chakra are: Clary Sage, Juniper, Geranium, Galbanum, Lemongrass, Bigarde Petitgrain, Pine, Cineole Rosemary, Dalmation Sage, Summer Savory, Spikenard, Black Spruce, White Thyme, and Vetiver.

    anahata heart chakra

  4. The Heart Chakra (Anahata)
    Color: Green
    Location: At the center of the chest on the sternum.
    – The Heart Chakra is the fourth chakra and represents love, passion, compassion, empathy, and devotion. But not just love as in loving another person, or loving your children. It represents the love of all things. The Heart Chakra is symbolized by the element of Air. When this chakra is out of balance, we can experience anxiety, hatefulness, a feeling of longing, arrogance, incompetence, discrimination, and a defiant attitude. The Heart Chakra is considered at the middle of the chakra system and often called the gateway to conciousness, because once you have balanced chakras 1-4, the following chakras 5-7 are more of the spiritual enlightenment aspect. You can use essential oils to balance the Heart Chakra such as Rose, Melissa, Neroli, Ginger, Goldenrod, Guaiacwood, Helichrysum, Hyssop, Linaloe, Litsea Cubeba, Lovage, Palmarosa, Cineole Rosemary, Rosewood, Spikenard, and Wintergreen.

    2000px-Vishuddhi_blue.svg throat chakra

  5. The Throat Chakra (Vishuddha)
    Color: Turquoise
    Location: Between the collar bone and larynx in the neck.
    – The Throat Chakra is the fifth chakra and it is associated with the element ether/akasha. Vishuddha means “to purify” and the lotus has 16 petals which are linked to each of the Sanskrit vowels, mantra, or a musical tone. The Throat Chakra is like a bridge from the heart where we start to raise our conciousness. It takes us from the physical aspect, to the spiritual aspect. This chakra represents our voice of goodness and speaking kind words, having fluent thoughts, feeling independent and secure in our life journey and our choices or decisions. When the Throat Chakra is not balanced, we can be speaking hurtful words, or we speak bitterly with the intention to hurt or break down others including ourselves. Essential oils that can be used to help balance this chakra are Lavender, Roman Chamomile, Rosemary, Thyme, Sage, Allspice Berry, Erigeron, Marigold Absolute, Patchouli, Sandalwood, and Tea Tree.

    third-eye-chakra.jpg.pagespeed.ce.mz56G6w0K5

  6. The Third Eye/Brow Chakra (Ajna)
    Color: Deep Blue or White
    Location: The center of the brow.
    – The Third Eye Chakra is also known as the Brow Chakra. Either name is fine to use. This chakra is represented by 2 petals which stand for the two aspects of prana that meet here. It represents the element of Ether. When the Third Eye Chakra is balanced, you are able to step beyond the physical mind of desires and enter realms of knowledge and wisdom. When this chakra is not balanced or blocked, you will tend to use your own powers or insight for negative things and spiritual arrogance. You mistaken information gathered with knowledge received or gained from insight. The Third Eye Chakra is used for intuition, deep meditations, and emotional clarity. Essential oils to assist in opening or balancing this chakra are Frankincense, Holy Basil, Peppermint, Spanish Sage, Tangerine, and Ylang-Ylang #2.

    crown chakra sahasrara

  7. The Crown Chakra (Sahasrara)
    Color: Violet
    Location: Top of the head.
    – The Crown Chakra is the last of the seven chakras. This chakra represents meditation, universal consciousness, being, and unity through transcendental consciousness. This is the place of pure consciousness and the balance of duality within us. It is hard to describe the Crown Chakra on a personal level because it is something that one must experience themselves to understand. It is a feeling of being completely one hundred percent at peace with all that is. When it is out of balance, many people often experience constant headaches which can mean you have an overactive mind, or your thoughts are so burdened with worry or obsession. You can use essential oils to help calm your mind and to balance or open the crown chakra. Essential oils you would want to use are White Thyme, Ylang-Ylang, Rosewood, Lime, Pink Lotus, White Lotus, or Blue Lotus.

 

When working with the chakra system and achieving balance or if you are wanting to open the chakras, it is important to prepare yourself and come up with your own rituals or ceremonies for this process. This gives intention for your actions and when you are wanting/needing to do energy work, these small phsyical actions will help calm your mind and prepare yourself in focusing on what you are wanting to do. Here are some examples that you can try out…

  • Smudging before meditation.
  • Washing your hands with cold water before and after your session.
  • Belly breathing through meditations.
  • 4 Part Breathing (breathe in for 10 seconds, hold your breath for 5 seconds, breathe out for 10 seconds, hold your breath for 5 seconds)
  • Check chakra flow using a pendulum or doing an aura check.
  • Color channeling to each chakra.
  • Using sound therapy such as tibetan singing bowls.
  • Using crystals that are associated with each chakra.
  • Reiki

Scientific Names & Why They Are Important

December 13th, 2016 by Natalie


Every animal species and every plant species has its own scientific name. Scientists have assigned these names to avoid confusion when talking about plants and animals. This process of assigning scientific names is called taxonomy which was developed by a Swedish scientist named Carolus  Linnaeus.

Carl_von_Linné

The first part of a scientific name is the genus of the plant, and the second part is the species of the plant.

Example: Lavandula (genus) angustifolia (species). This is one of the scientific names for lavender. 

The first part of the name groups the plants by it’s botanical features. Such as flower type and leaf arrangement. The second part of the name is based on habitat or distinguishing characteristics. Sometimes a third name is added if there is a difference within the species.

scientific name example

So why is this important? There are many reasons why this is important. If you are wanting to buy lavender essential oil and you walked into a store and just asked for lavender, they are just going to hand you a bottle of whatever they have. But, there are differences in lavender. And to know these differences, you need the scientific name. The scientific name provides you with all the information about the plant and how it was cultivated.

Lavandula angustifolia which can be from Mediterranean, Bulgaria, and English lavenders.

Lavandula x intermedia (these are english hybrid lavenders, also called Lavandin)

There is actually around 70 species of lavender! Not all are used to make essential oils though.

 

The same can go for Chamomile. There is Roman Chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile) and German Chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla). Also with eucalyptus oils. And each of those also have several scientific names. The scientific names tell us what genus and species the plant is, the area the plant was grown, therapeutic properties, and chemical composition which is very important because some essential oils have certain natural chemicals in it that are not safe for children or pregnant women.

 

If you order the Gritman Guide, there is a chart in the back which lists the scientific names and the common names next to it, as well as listing the common names and then the scientific names so you can study it and become familiar with using scientific names when talking about essential oils.

 

 

 

Essential Oils & Grief

December 11th, 2016 by Natalie


Grief is a process that eventually everybody goes through for various reasons. Loss of a loved one, loss of a job, loss of a beloved pet… The processing of grief is very important for ones emotional well being, and also their physical well being. Many people turn to their family and friends for support and comforting during this time, sadly others turn to drugs or alcohol or other vices to help numb the pain away. But with grief, as much as we want to make the pain disappear, you just can’t. You end up riding the waves and doing the best you can while processing and working through the emotions you are having. Anger, sadness, loneliness, agitation, insomnia, nightmares, etc… these can all be part of the grieving. And grieving has no time frame. For some people it can take a few weeks, for others it can take several years. However long it takes, just know that you are not alone. You will get through this.

It is important to take care of your physical body at this time making sure you are eating properly and staying hydrated and nourishing your body with what it needs. But it is also just as important to nourish your emotional and spiritual mind too. Using aromatherapy can be very beneficial to the grieving process. Essential oils can help you through the emotions of anger, resentment, sadness, and many others. They can be used in bath therapy, meditation, massage, diffusing, or personal inhalers.

  • ACCEPTANCE: Egyptian Anise Seed, Helichrysum, Yellow Lemon, Orange, Hemlock Spruce.
  • ANGER: Allspice Berry, Peru Balsam, Cajeput, Cassia Bark, Blue Chamomile, Davana, Dill Weed, Ginger, Melissa Blend, Red Mandarin, Rosemary, White Thyme.
  • COMFORT: Lavenders, Sandalwood, Canadian Balsam, Rosemary, Rose
  • DEATH: Cade, Storax, Valerian Root
  • DEPRESSION: Allspice Berry, Himalayan Cedarwood, Wild Chamomile, Bergamot, Patchouli, Bigarde Petitgrain, Rose Absolute, Clary Sage, Sandalwood, Spearmint, Tea Tree, Red Thyme
  • EASE OF EMOTIONS: Chaste Tree, Green Lemon, Lemongrass, Indian Lemongrass, Patchouli, Bigarde Petitgrain
  • FORGIVENESS: Bay, Cade, Frankincense, Ginger, Winter Savory, Blue Tansy
  • GUILT: Cade, Cajeput
  • HEALING PROCESS: Cardamon Seed, Labdanum, Black Pepper
  • LONELINESS: Sweet Basil, Patchouli, Wormwood (under supervision)
  • LOSS: Anise Seed, Bay, White Birch, Maile Fern, Rosewood, Clary Sage, Wintergreen
  • PEACE: Copaiba Balsam, Benzoin Absolute, Roman Chamomile, Cistus, Galbanum, Garlic, Labdanum, Northwest Lavender, Spike Lavender, Neroli, Bitter Orange, Oregano, Parsley, Winter Savory, Blue Tansy, Valerian Root
  • PROCESSING EMOTIONS: Anise Seed, Hops, Turkish Pennyroyal
  • RESENTMENT: Ginger, Onion, Peppermint
  • SPIRITUAL GUIDANCE: Tolu Balsam, Mugwort, Olibanum (Frankincense), Onion, Sweet Orange, Red Mandarin, Winter Savory, Spearmint
  • STRESS: Blue Egyptian Chamomile, Cypress, Cypriol, Davana, Dill Weed, Elemi, Gingergrass, Goldenrod, Turkish Hyssop, Northwest Lavender, Neroli, Nutmeg, Bergamot, Bitter Orange, Summer Savory, St.Johns Wort, White thyme, Ylang Ylang #2, Ylang Ylang #3
  • STRUGGLE: Ajowan, Canadian Balsam, Champaca, Guaiacwood, Lavandin, Niaouli
  • TRAUMA: Star Anise, Cajeput, Thuja Cedar Leaf, Atlas Cedarwood, Clove Bud, Garlic, Sweet Marjoram, Bigarde Petitgrain, Pine, White Pine, Tangerine, Vetiver, Wormwood, Yarrow
  • WORRY: Copaiba Balsam, Goldenrod, Black & Red Henna, Turkish Hyssop

Essential Oils & Toothaches

December 9th, 2016 by Natalie


toothache

So, I found it kind of appropriate to write up a short blog over which essential oils to use for a toothache (adult), since I am currently dealing with two broken molars right now and one has been rather uncomfortable today.

Toothaches are not enjoyable. Whether it is sharp excruciating root pain, or that constant dull, throbbing ache that won’t budge. It is just not pleasant and can definitely interfere with daily life and activities and can also cause a lot of emotional stress until it is taken care of.

When dealing with toothaches and looking for an essential oil to use, the most common issues you are wanting to relieve is pain and inflammation. So analgesic and antiinflammatory essential oils would be great to use, but you also want to use antiseptic and antibacterial oils.

It is not always necessary to mix up a blend because usually just using one will help relieve the issues temporarily until you can get your tooth looked at by a dentist. I am going to list several essential oils though that are commonly used for toothaches.

 

  • Cornmint (Mentha arvenis) – Anesthetic, antimicrobial, antiseptic. Used for swollen inflamed gums, mouthwash, toothache, and mouth ulcers.
  • Ravensara (Ravensara aromatica) – Analgesic. Used for toothache to relieve pain.
  • Sweet Birch (Betula lenta) – Analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic. Used for toothache to relieve pain.
  • Clove Bud (Syzygium aromaticum) – Analgesic, antiseptic, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial. Used for toothache to relieve pain and to numb area, good to use for root canals to stop pain and prevent infection.
  • Myrrh (Commiphora myrrha) – Anti-inflammatory. Used for oral health care to prevent gum disease and inflammation.

Another great essential oil to use is actually a blend that is made by Gritman called Dad’s Gum Care. This blend contains Myrrh, Tea Tree, Clove, Allspice Berry, and Peppermint. We also carry a mouthwash of this blend which contains Rum, 40 proof.

 

If your toothache continues, please seek medical care by a licensed dentist so they can get to the root cause of the pain.

Davana… Have you tried it?

December 9th, 2016 by Natalie


Davana-artemisia-pallens

Davana – Artemisia Pallens 

 

Davana essential oil has many medicinal benefits which makes it a great choice for many reasons. Davana comes from India and mostly known for its uses in the East, rather in the West. It is not a very common essential oil so not many people have heard of it nor used it. But, if you have, you quite possibly remember it because of its scent. Davana is referred to as a base note when it comes to blending. The aroma is a sweet floral but also has a slight hint of a strawberry smell to it. It is very lovely and when you blend, it blends well with Chamomile, Neroli, Coriander, Geranium, Grapefruit, and Cedarwood. It blends well with citrus, woodsy, and spicy.

Physical uses for Davana include pain relief, dry skin, skin infections, and menstrual issues such as regulating or inducing menstruation. It can also be used for coughs, congestion, and nausea.

Emotional uses for Davana include using it for anxiety, stress, when you are angry so it helps you to release the anger to become happy, depression, and during times of fear.

You can use Davana and other essential oils in a massage with a carrier, bath therapy, and diffuse or personal inhaler.

***Be cautious with Davana due to it having a high ketone level, so that means to NOT use it on children, or if you are pregnant.

 

What Can You Do With An Aromatherapy Certification?

December 7th, 2016 by Natalie


Before signing up for classes, many people wonder what exactly can you do with an aromatherapy certification. What kind of jobs can you apply for? Can you open your own business? What school should I choose? When it comes to choosing a school, that is a very personal choice of the consumer. What is important to you for your education? Do you learn better online at your own pace, or do you learn better in person? Do you want to be challenged into doing all the research for your questions? Do you work well under deadlines? These are all things to take into consideration when looking at schools.

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So what kind of jobs can you get once you complete your certification courses?

 

There are many different options to choose from when applying for a job. It might be hard, but it is not impossible. Here are a few things that you can look for in your area:

  • Hospice/Palliative Care
  • Aromatherapy Educator/Teacher
  • Consultant for spas
  • Business Owner
  • Author
  • Public Speaker
  • Aromatherapy Consultant
  • Design your own products
  • Work in an alternative medicine clinic
  • Custom blending for your clients
  • and many more!

Many people continue on with their education and pursue their massage therapy license so that they can incorporate the essential oils into their massage therapy work. Currently, aromatherapy is an unregulated and unlicensed field of practice, but that can always change. So it is a good idea to check with your state laws where you live to see if there are any rules or regulations where you are if you are wanting to make and sell products, or start a private practice.